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African adolescent girls studying

Toward a safer tomorrow

Together for Girls Impact Report
2022-2023

Violence against children is a global crisis that happens in every country.

Childhood violence can have devastating, life-long consequences. But violence is preventable, and change is possible. Our partnerships model drives action to ensure prevention, healing, and justice.

Understanding sexual violence
Illustration of two children with a cirlce behind them

Together, we are creating a world where every child and adolescent is safe, protected, and thriving.

Our Impact on the Violence Against Children and Youth Surveys and associated data to action process:

21 millionchildren’s experiences accounted for in 2 newly published VACS reports

41% dropof girls in Eswatini who experienced sexual violence between 1st and 2nd VACS

2 VACSin humanitarian contexts underway in Uganda and Ethiopia

9 countriesin Africa committed to using VACS data to drive national action for child wellbeing

6 VACS fellowsfrom Kenya, Colombia, Côte d’Ivoire and Namibia with increased capacity to do research on violence against children

5 nationalData-to-Action workshops conducted with government leadership, bringing together sectors to address violence

50% dropin young women in Kenya experiencing childhood sexual violence, according to new VACS comparison study

illustration boys on bicycle impact report.png

The Violence Against Children and Youth Surveys (VACS) are the largest source of data on violence against children in the world. Over the last decade the impact of the VACS has been transformational.

We're stronger together. Our impact in survivor-centered advocacy and sharing solutions:

1 survivor-centeredmovement launched, including 15 survivor advocates leading the Brave Movement

1 reportissued on abolishing statutes of limitations across Europe

14 Bravecatalytic grants extended to grassroots survivor organizations across the world

1st-everleaders joint commitment declared by all G7 countries to protect children from abuse

1 Safe Futures Hubpartnership created, dedicated to amplifying global solutions to end violence

1 U.S.National Action Plan on gender-based violence released with a focus on children and youth

Together for Girls highlights 2022-2023

01Foreword

TfG's CEO & President, Daniela Ligiero and Gary Cohen, TfG’s Founder and Board Chair
TfG's CEO & President, Daniela Ligiero and Gary Cohen, TfG’s Founder and Board Chair.

Message from the Founder and CEO

Since 2009, Together for Girls has been a global pioneer to create a safer world for children and adolescents.

We know violence is preventable and change is possible, because we've seen it in action over the past 14 years. Our partnership was founded on guiding principles that have proven the power of partnership and driven real change in the lives of children and young people around the globe.

We areSurvivor-centered:

In 2022, with other partners, we launched the Brave Movement - the first of its kind global survivor-centered advocacy movement to end sexual violence against children. With an advisory group of 15 powerful survivor advocates from around the world, and many more survivors and allies, we're already making waves on some of the biggest stages around the world.

We areEvidence-based:

To date, our partnership has interviewed more than 90,228 adolescents and young people through the VACS, amassing data that is representative of 33% of the world's youth (under 24) living in lower-income countries, where data is often severely lacking. We also work to expand the definition of “evidence” by incorporating practice-based knowledge and lived experience into solutions to end sexual violence against children, as seen in our new initiative, the Safe Futures Hub.

We areRadically collaborative:

We unite different actors and disciplines that often do not work together to address a multi-faceted problem. We support national leaders to work across sectors and engage with civil society and other local stakeholders to create change on a regional and global level.

We know Together for Girls can continue to create real change and build a safe future where every child and adolescent is safe, protected, and thriving. Our work is fueled by hope because we know violence is preventable and change is possible. I am a researcher, a psychologist, and a survivor of childhood sexual violence. I've been sharing my experience publicly for more than a decade to help drive change. We know what works. Now, it is on us to bring it to scale.

Daniela LigieroChief Executive Officer & President, Together for Girls
Daniela Ligiero headshot
Children on beach

02A decade of data to action

Group of children philippines

The Violence Against Children and Youth Surveys (VACS) are the largest source of data on violence against children, adolescents, and youth in the world.

Over the last 10 years, they have amassed data on 33% of the world's youth under 24 living in lower-income countries, where any data is often severely lacking, leading to a coordinated, multi-sectoral response to the issue.

Girls in front of coloured wall

More than 111,000 young people, aged 13-24, around the world have been interviewed directly about their experience with sexual violence and connected with services and support. 

The VACS are led by national governments, with technical assistance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as part of the Together for Girls (TfG) partnership. The VACS are supported by multiple partners on the ground, including UNICEF, and are often funded by the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR).

Through our model of data and advocacy, we drive action on violence prevention, healing, and justice. 

Ugandan boys at school window
Eswatini smiling girl

Eswatini

In 2007, Eswatini was the very first country to undertake the groundbreaking Violence Against Children and Youth Survey (VACS).

This unprecedented survey was the first of its kind, globally, to collect national level data on ‌sexual, physical, and emotional violence against girls and young adult females between the ages of 13 and 24. 

​​In 2022, data collection was completed for Eswatini's second VACS, this time including the experiences of both boys and girls. Eswatini is currently working on its national action plan to guide the implementation of its responses to the 2023 VACS data.

Eswatini community sessions
Eswatini three youth
Eswatini group kids
Eswatini youth football
Eswatini community sessions
Eswatini three youth

In the 15 intervening years between Eswatini's two VACS:

  • There have been notable reductions in all forms of violence against girls and young women in Eswatini.

  • There were declines in lifetime sexual violence, including unwanted sexual touching, unwanted attempted sex, pressured sex, and physically forced sex.

  • Physical violence and emotional violence have also declined among girls and young women.

What does the data show us?

This second Eswatini VACS shows remarkable progress, with a significant reduction of violence against children and youth. Eswatini used data from their first survey to inform a series of targeted and context-specific interventions. Of course there is much more to do, but the results from Eswatini prove that when we use data to drive cross-sectoral actions and to measure their impacts, change is possible.

Najat Maalla M'jidUN Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Violence Against Children
Najat Maalla Mjid
Image credit: United Nations
Mozambique kids football

Mozambique

In 2019 the Government of Mozambique conducted VACS data collection, the first survey of this type in the country, with funding from PEPFAR and technical assistance from CDC and UNICEF.

Ahead of the VACS report launch in 2022, Mozambique held its Data to Action workshop - the largest to date - and included translating outcomes for high-level representatives including ministry leadership. Recommendations from the workshop focused on addressing physical and sexual violence, social norms change, and targeting interventions focused on education, life skills, economic and income support, and parenting. 

Mozambique is currently working on its national action plan to guide the implementation of these recommendations.

Girl from Mozambique

Key insights of Mozambique VACS 2019

  • Mozambique conducted the first VACS in a Portuguese-speaking country.

  • Mozambique VACS data uncovered the role and connection violence plays in the HIV epidemic in Mozambique.

  • The results of VACS have potential to inform HIV epidemic control efforts as well as strategies for violence prevention and child protection.

What does the data show us?

Humanitarian VACS

Implementing the VACS in humanitarian settings

Half of the refugees around the world are under 18. While children and adolescents are the most affected in humanitarian emergencies, there is little data on their experiences of violence in these contexts.

The first-ever Humanitarian Violence Against Children and Youth Survey in Uganda and Ethiopia is led by Population Council's Baobab Research Programme Consortium, with support from UNHCR, CDC and Together for Girls and in partnership with the Uganda Office of the Prime Minister Department of Refugees.

In Uganda, the Humanitarian VACS process was carried out from 2022-2023 with funding from the U.K.’s Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO), and Global Affairs Canada. The report will be launched in 2024.

Humanitarian setting
Guatemalan girl with baby

Focusing on young people in Guatemala

The Guatemalan Youth Survey (GYS) is the country’s largest study to measure violence against children and youth, and assess the relationship of violence and risk factors and outcomes.

The GYS was conducted in 2019 and the report launched in November 2023. It provides additional information on historically socio-economically disadvantaged areas. Unlike the VACS, the GYS is a convenience sample survey and the data is not nationally representative.

The GYS was led by the Government of Guatemala, and the Ministry of Public Health and Social Assistance. It was supported by the International Organization on Migration (OIM), the Universidad del Valle de Guatemala, USAID Central America Regional Security Initiative, and USAID Guatemala.

Girl in market Guatemala

Key facts about GYS 2019:

  • Due to the large sample size, data yields important information about the experiences of adolescents and young adults to inform country priorities.

  • The core VACS questionnaire was adapted to the country context.

  • The survey was conducted in Spanish and four Mayan languages.

  • CDC was engaged during the survey planning and protocol development phases.

Children Guatemala
Beatriz Caicedo Velásquez
Beatriz Caicedo Velásquez, Professor-Researcher, University of Antioquia, Colombia.
Daisy Chelangat
Daisy Chelangat, Research Associate, Aga Khan University, Kenya.
Anne Ngunjiri
Anne Ngunjiri, Senior Technical Advisor, GBV Program, LVCT Health Kenya.
Bangaman
Bangaman Akani, PhD, Dept Public Health, University of Felix, Côte d'Ivoire.
Frank migone
Frank Migone, Economist, Institut National de la Statistique, Côte d'Ivoire.
Shelene Gentz
Shelene Gentz, Senior Lecturer, Human Science, University of Namibia.
Beatriz Caicedo Velásquez
Beatriz Caicedo Velásquez, Professor-Researcher, University of Antioquia, Colombia.
Daisy Chelangat
Daisy Chelangat, Research Associate, Aga Khan University, Kenya.

Empowering the next generation of researchers

Using VACS data to build research excellence and influence policymakers

Civil servants from multiple government ministries, universities and NGO leaders from a wide range of countries from across Africa, South and Central America and the Caribbean participated in VACS trainings and have increased capacity on research and interventions related to violence against children. In addition,Together for Girls and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine co-created a course to support early career researchers from countries that have completed a VACS to conduct new research utilising the survey data. This initiative was supported by Beckton Dickinson.

Six participants from Kenya, Colombia, Côte d’Ivoire and Namibia participated in 12-session course that included lectures, practicals, 1:1 mentorship sessions, panel discussions and a final presentation from participants at a global webinar.

Brave group

03Survivors demanding a safer world

Members of Brave Movement Kenya hold a banner that says "Brave Movement to End Childhood Sexual Violence."
Brave Movement Kenya commemorating Day of the African Child 2022 under the theme “Eliminating Harmful Practices Affecting Children: Progress on Policy & Practice since 2013.”

It started with an ambitious question: What would it take to create a movement of survivors and allies to end childhood sexual violence?

Inspired by the global reach of movements like #MeToo, and emboldened by powerful conversations with individuals with lived experience – public or not – Together for Girls worked with partners to launch the Brave Movement in 2022. Brave seeks to elevate survivor voices and support international, coordinated action to end all forms of sexual violence against children and adolescents.

With an unprecedented four-year investment from Oak Foundation, one of the largest such awards for survivor-centered advocacy and campaigns, the Brave Movement is shifting societal norms and eradicating survivor stigma through a framework of prevention, healing, and justice.

Led by a diverse group of survivor leaders from around the world, who are all co-founders of the Brave Movement, the SAGE (Survivor Advocates Globally Empowered) is at the heart of the brave movement.

Brave Movement Poster
In 2022, the Brave Movement was launched at a Global Survivors Action Summit. Survivors and allies convened, drawing on survivor-centered national calls to action from over 20 countries, a G7 call to action led by survivors in every G7 country, and solidarity statements.
The Brave SAGE members and team 2023
The first Brave Movement in-person workshop with SAGE members (Survivor Advocates Globally Empowered) and Action Team in March 2023 allowed for capacity building, strategy development, and action-planning.

Campaigning highlights

G7 Leaders commit to increasing efforts to combat child sexual exploitation and abuse - online and offline: The single largest policy win for Brave was getting the G7, in 2022, and for the first time in history, to prioritize the issue of child sexual abuse and exploitation in the leader’s communique.

Advocating for an end to the statutes of limitations: Brave published two reports together with Child Global in 2023 on ending the statute of limitations across Europe. The most recent, "Justice Unleashed: Ending Limitations, Protecting Children", was published in July 2023 and received widespread media coverage.

Campaigning for a Safer Internet: is the global campaign priority for 2023-24, addressing the rapid, borderless threat of online sexual exploitation and abuse of children. The #BeBraveEU campaign to make the internet safe for kids and end child sexual abuse in the EU has gathered over 350,000 signatures. Also, Brave advocates have worked through coalitions and partnerships to meet with U.S. lawmakers and share public calls for tech leaders for stronger commitments.

Al jazeera Brave Justice for child sex abuse should not depend on postcodes
Justice for child sex abuse should not depend on postcodes by Matthew McVarish, actor, human rights activist and Co-founder, Brave Movement.
Al Jazeera Brave big Tech has allowed child sex abuse to become prolific online Brave campaign Brussels
Big Tech has allowed child sex abuse to become prolific online by Mié Kohiyama, Co-founder, Brave Movement and child rights activist.
AL Jazeera Brave healing from the trauma of childhood sexual violence is possible
Healing from the trauma of childhood sexual violence is possible by Tabitha Mpamira, Co-founder, Brave Movement and Founder and CEO, Mutera Global Healing.
Al jazeera Brave behind every child sex abuse image, there is a real child
Behind every child sex abuse image, there is a real child by Bob Shilling, Co-Founder, Brave Movement and Former Head of Crimes Against Children, INTERPOL.
Al jazeera Brave we need to free our schools of sexual violence
We need to free our schools of sexual violence by Kanga Rasi, social justice advocate and Africa Campaign Manager, Brave Movement.
Al Jazeera Brave our response to childhood sexual violence is part of the problem sihouette of hands
Our response to childhood sexual violence is part of the problem by Florence Keya, Founder, Maisha Girls Safehouse and Co-founder, Brave Movement.
Al Jazeera Brave break silence on childhood sexual violence silhouette of girl
It’s time to break the silence on childhood sexual violence by Daniela Ligiero, Chief Executive Officer, Together for Girls and Co-founder, Brave Movement.
Al jazeera Brave Justice for child sex abuse should not depend on postcodes
Justice for child sex abuse should not depend on postcodes by Matthew McVarish, actor, human rights activist and Co-founder, Brave Movement.
Al Jazeera Brave big Tech has allowed child sex abuse to become prolific online Brave campaign Brussels
Big Tech has allowed child sex abuse to become prolific online by Mié Kohiyama, Co-founder, Brave Movement and child rights activist.

Shattering the silence of childhood sexual violence: A series of widely-shared opinion pieces in Al Jazeera

Featuring the Brave Movement’s survivor leader advisory team, these articles are drawing attention to survivor leadership and expertise, and are building awareness of the Movement’s global activism around key priority campaign areas.

I have found profound healing and acceptance among this global community of brave and strong survivors. We are making waves at the highest level to make sure children grow up safe and free, and that is validating and empowering... But we need allies. If we want to go far, it will take collective, global action at scale.

Tabitha MpamiraCo-founder, Brave Movement, Vice-chair, SAGE, and Founder, Mutera Global Healing
TabithaMpamira

We are Brave.
A survivor-centered global movement working to end childhood sexual violence.

Sexual violence against children and adolescents is the silent scourge of our time. It threatens the safety and protection of children and adolescents everywhere–in homes, communities, schools, places of worship, sport, conflict areas, and online. We demand bold and transformative action from global leaders with campaigns across prevention, healing, and justice.

Brave Movement march

04Data & evidence to drive action

Data which exposes the extent of violence against children, paired with advocacy, can catalyze programs, policies, and interventions that make a tangible difference in the lives of children.

Four continents. 20 countries. 225 stakeholders. In 2022, an independent evaluation synthesized more than a decade of country experiences transforming VACS results into concrete improvements for young people and for preventing gender-based violence. 

As a result of the VACS: 

  • 13 countries added/amended child safety laws

  • 10 countries banned corporal punishment

  • 9 countries banned child marriage

  • 5 countries included VACS indicators in national statistics

  • 5 countries launched new initiatives addressing the safety of girls

Children from Latin America

Recommendations to continue this transformational change include:

  • More funding, political will, and increased coordination across sectors.

  • Strengthen capacity in a range of technical and operational areas

  • Increased involvement of civil society, including survivor-led and centered organizations

  • Greater advocacy with governments and donors for VACS in more countries and more sustained post-VACS follow-up

All the recommendations have helped shape an updated Together for Girls strategy.

Girl running in green circle illustration impact report pullout

The results were unequivocal: Every country that conducted a VACS has used the survey results to inform policies and programs to improve the lives of children and youth.

Rita Activist PEPFAR KENYA
Rita Mutheu, business owner and activist for women's rights.
Flovian DREAMS project
Flovian, a participant of PEPFAR's DREAM Programme in Kenya.
DREAMS Kenya LVCT
Commemorating "16 days of Activism Against GBV." Image credit: LVCT Kenya.
Yurub 1 dreams project kenya
Kenyan DREAMS Programme participant, Yorub. Photo courtesy of PEPFAR Kenya.
Rita Activist PEPFAR KENYA
Rita Mutheu, business owner and activist for women's rights.
Flovian DREAMS project
Flovian, a participant of PEPFAR's DREAM Programme in Kenya.

Celebrating a decade of change in Kenya

In Kenya, the Government used data from the 2010 Violence Against Children and Youth Survey to guide the creation of a National Action Plan aimed at preventing violence and improving response.

Between the first and second Kenyan VACS, the prevalence of any childhood sexual violence experienced by 18-24 year old girls was reduced by 50%, and 66% for boys.

What does the data show us?

Linda Kelley PEPFAR KENYA
Linda, grade 8 student. Image credit: PEPFAR Kenya.

How did Kenya achieve a 50% reduction in the prevalence rates of violence?

A landmark, qualitative study on violence against children was conducted to examine the shifts in children’s experiences of violence in Kenya from 2010 to 2019.

Supported by Wellspring Philanthropic Fund, and led by the Kenyan organization, LVCT Health, the qualitative study explored violence against children policies and guidelines established during this period. It also reviewed the strategies and interventions employed to reinforce violence prevention and response services.

Grace Paralegal PEPFAR Kenya
Grace Aketch, Paralegal Officer, a PEPFAR/CDC Champion for Change in Kenya to end violence, helps survivors get justice.

Factors that led to the decline of violence against children between 2010 and 2019:

  • Strengthened legal and policy frameworks

  • Strengthened workforce to deliver coordinated, collaborative services

  • Increased funding for services

  • Increased community awareness

  • Children's increased knowledge of their rights and participation in violence against children matters

  • Increased school enrollment and retention, and safe school environments

  • Strengthened household economic resources

  • Increased and improved response services

  • Strengthened data collection and reporting system

  • Availability of kenya-specific and county-level data

Abdihakim Police Constable PEPFAR KENYA
Abdi Hakim, police constable, a PEPFAR/CDC Champion for Change to end violence.
Amina Gender Police PEPFAR KENYA
Amina Mohamed, Child Protection Officer, a PEPFAR/CDC Champion for Change to end violence.
K Zee Musician PEPFAR Kenya
Fresh Cutz Foundation, where young men can have open conversations and an alternative to crime, drugs, and even gangs that rape women.
DREAMS LVCT Kenya catering
A cooking competition at the Kiandutu DREAMS site. Credit: Rebecca Musanga, LVCT Health.
DREAMS LVCT Kenya menstrual class
DREAMS girls programme participants pose for a photo during a Menstrual Health Day, Riabai DREAMS. Credit: Rebecca Musanga, LVCT Health.
DREAMS LVCT Kenya group male
Men not left behind during Menstrual Health Hygiene Day, Kiatundu. Credit: Rebecca Musanga, LVCT Health.
Abdihakim Police Constable PEPFAR KENYA
Abdi Hakim, police constable, a PEPFAR/CDC Champion for Change to end violence.
Amina Gender Police PEPFAR KENYA
Amina Mohamed, Child Protection Officer, a PEPFAR/CDC Champion for Change to end violence.
K Zee Musician PEPFAR Kenya
Fresh Cutz Foundation, where young men can have open conversations and an alternative to crime, drugs, and even gangs that rape women.
DREAMS LVCT Kenya catering
A cooking competition at the Kiandutu DREAMS site. Credit: Rebecca Musanga, LVCT Health.
DREAMS LVCT Kenya menstrual class
DREAMS girls programme participants pose for a photo during a Menstrual Health Day, Riabai DREAMS. Credit: Rebecca Musanga, LVCT Health.
DREAMS LVCT Kenya group male
Men not left behind during Menstrual Health Hygiene Day, Kiatundu. Credit: Rebecca Musanga, LVCT Health.
Abdihakim Police Constable PEPFAR KENYA
Abdi Hakim, police constable, a PEPFAR/CDC Champion for Change to end violence.
Amina Gender Police PEPFAR KENYA
Amina Mohamed, Child Protection Officer, a PEPFAR/CDC Champion for Change to end violence.
K Zee Musician PEPFAR Kenya
Fresh Cutz Foundation, where young men can have open conversations and an alternative to crime, drugs, and even gangs that rape women.
DREAMS LVCT Kenya catering
A cooking competition at the Kiandutu DREAMS site. Credit: Rebecca Musanga, LVCT Health.
DREAMS LVCT Kenya menstrual class
DREAMS girls programme participants pose for a photo during a Menstrual Health Day, Riabai DREAMS. Credit: Rebecca Musanga, LVCT Health.
DREAMS LVCT Kenya group male
Men not left behind during Menstrual Health Hygiene Day, Kiatundu. Credit: Rebecca Musanga, LVCT Health.
Health ministers in East, Central, and Southern Africa pass resolution to end violence against children
Manuela Balliet Ahogo (Together for Girls), Ntoli Moletsane (Sentebale), Puleng Ramphalla (CDC Lesotho), Umasree Polepeddi (Unicef Lesotho), Luis Gadama (University of Malawi), Sunday Dominico (Thamini Uhai), Rosemary Mwaisaka (ECSA-HC), Andrew Silumesii (ECSA-HC) gather outside the East, Central, and Southern Africa Health Community (ECSA-HC) Health Ministers Conference in Maseru, Lesotho.

Health ministers across Africa commit to using VACS data

In February 2023, at the 71st East, Central, and Southern Africa Health Community (ECSA-HC) Health Ministers Conference in Lesotho, government leaders enacted ECSA/HMC71/R3, a resolution that acknowledges the prevalence of violence against children in the region and commits to using data to drive action against it. The resolution places specific emphasis on using Violence Against Children and Youth Survey (VACS) data to inform action. 

Three countries in the ECSA region - Kenya, Eswatini, and Zimbabwe - have conducted repeat VACS. Botswana, Kenya, Malawi, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe all added or amended existing child safety laws or regulations in response to VACS data and post-VACS efforts.

Brave Movement Supporters

05Shaping global & national policy agendas

Namibian school children play outside

Advocating for safe and equitable schools

An estimated 246 million girls and boys experience violence in and around schools every year. But it doesn't have to be this way.

While schools can be a site of violence, we know that they ‌can also play a powerful role in catalyzing broader social change to break cycles of violence. Despite knowing the huge scale and wide-reaching impacts of school-related gender-based violence (SRGBV) not enough is being done politically and at the education policy level to end violence in and through schools.

Our secondary analyses of VACS contain a wealth of information about violence that happens in school and on the way to school, making VACS one of the most important data sources globally on SRGBV.

I was born at a time when Sierra Leone was already bleeding, when men were socialized to think that women's bodies were a battlefield. A time when children picked up arms and  learned to fend for themselves. I  grew up in this era of war. I hoped school would save me and help me forget about what was going on around me but I realized early on that school was also not a safe place for me.

Josephine KamaraYouth leader with Safe to Learn
Profile image of Josephine Kamara
People holding hands together in circle

Survivor-centered advocacy in the United States

Through Keep Kids Safe, the US-based platform of the Brave Movement, we are co-creating a survivor-centered movement aimed at ensuring a comprehensive national response to ending sexual violence against children and adolescents in the United States.

In the US, about 1 in 4 girls and 1 in 13 boys experience child sexual abuse before their 18th birthday. More than 42 million American survivors of child sexual abuse and child sexual violence, deserve and demand prevention, healing, justice and action.

Survivors have lived through the abuse. We have a unique perspective on the solutions. No one wants to prevent future abuse more than someone who lived through it. No one wants other survivors to heal more than those who know the effort required to heal. And no one wants to see justice served more than someone who watched justice pass them by.

Tom KruminsChief of Staff, Brave Movement
Tom Krummins headshot
Keep Kids Safe survivors national blueprint capitol hill
Keep Kids Safe coalition members with the National Blueprint on Capitol Hill, April 2023.
Keep Kids Safe outside the US Capitol
Members of the Keep Kids Safe coalition went to Capitol Hill in Washington, DC to meet with decision-makers, April 2023.
KKS group photo white house meeting
Members of the Keep Kids Safe coalition at the White House meeting with the Gender Policy Council and Domestic Policy Council, April 2023.
Keep Kids Safe survivors national blueprint capitol hill
Keep Kids Safe coalition members with the National Blueprint on Capitol Hill, April 2023.
Keep Kids Safe outside the US Capitol
Members of the Keep Kids Safe coalition went to Capitol Hill in Washington, DC to meet with decision-makers, April 2023.

In November 2021, Keep Kids Safe released the US National Blueprint to End Sexual Violence Against Children and Adolescents, a roadmap that outlines steps the United States federal government can take to prevent sexual violence against children and adolescents, and ensure that those who experience sexual violence have access to healing and justice. 

In May 2023 the US Government published its first ever National Action Plan on gender-based violence, heavily focused on children and adolescents as a direct result of Keep Kids Safe advocacy.

Keep Kids Safe members have led the effort to protect Victims of Crime Act funding, provided testimony at a Congressional hearing on the efficacy of the SafeSport, joined the Boy Scouts of America Youth Protection Committee, engaged in state-level statute of limitations reform, and raised awareness through the Walk Together to End Child Abuse and Neglect.

Safeguarding in sports
Children playing football as part of a UNICEF-supported project for vulnerable children in Maramvya site for internationally displaced people, Bujumbura suburbs. The project implemented by Sport Sans Frontieres, an international NGO, aims to educate through sports activities. Photo: UNICEF/UNI123577/Krzysiek.

Galvanizing political will for global investment to end child sexual abuse

In September 2023, we collaborated with FP Analytics on the first of its kind study which reports that globally, financing for the prevention of child sexual abuse is woefully inadequate and lacks transparency. 

On the backdrop to the 78th session of the UN General Assembly, this joint political push with World Vision and the Oak Foundation calls on decision makers to realize both the economic and moral imperatives for greater transparent funding.

three children holding hands

06Championing solutions to end violence against children

Launching in 2024, the Safe Futures Hub: Solutions to end childhood sexual violence is an open platform to share evidence-based solutions to end childhood sexual violence, including practice-based knowledge.

With support from Oak Foundation, the Safe Futures Hub will serve as a resource for evidence-based solutions, sharing of best practices, and learning for all of us working around the world to create a safer future for children, including advocates, strategists, policymakers, frontline workers, and youth voices.

As a global problem, childhood sexual violence requires a global solution. The Safe Futures Hub has immense power to unite diverse stakeholders in a collaborative effort to share evidence that can help prevent and eradicate this issue. 

On the backdrop of 78th session of the UN General Assembly, Together for Girls, WeProtect Global Alliance and the Sexual Violence Research Initiative announced this new partnership at the Clinton Global Initiative, which brings together global partners dedicated to solving the world’s most pressing challenges.

Guiding principles:

Safe Futures is designed to meaningfully include underrepresented perspectives often excluded in the past, including those from lower-income countries with live experiences

We recognize the profound impact of leveraging multiple forms of knowledge, including firsthand experiences from the field, lived experience, academic research and administrative data

We work in partnership, understanding the urgent need for more collaboration, innovation, and diversity in order to combat this complex and horrific issue.

This dynamic fusion of different forms of knowledge serves as the catalyst for generating new insights, fostering discussions, and igniting actionable solutions.

It's crucial to recognize that childhood sexual violence is a preventable public health challenge, and we are resolute in our efforts to address it. Through the Safe Futures Hub, we wield immense power to foster collaboration, innovation, and meaningful change by tapping into the collective insights of communities and stakeholders across the globe.

Nicolas MakharashviliExecutive Director, Safe Futures Hub
Nicolas Makharashvili
Illustration girl with open arms

The evidence is clear: there is strength in numbers. 

Together, we can break the cycle of violence.

Partners

Together for Girls partners include survivor activists, civil society, national governments, United Nations entities, and the world's foremost leaders in global health, gender equity, development, and violence prevention and response. 

Management analysis and financial overview

The Together for Girls partnership has made incredible progress in the past two years. This progress is made possible by our donors, partners and supporters. We thank all of you for enabling us to continue this work to end violence against children.

Leadership and donors 2021 - 2023

Together for Girls, Inc. donors 2021-2023

Children’s Investment Fund Foundation

Gary Cohen, TfG Founder and Board Chair

Government of Canada

Oak Foundation

Swiss Philanthropy Foundation

Tides Foundation

U.S. Government

Wellspring Philanthropic Fund

Together for Girls Board of Directors

Gary Cohen, Founder and Board Chair

Brandi Robinson, Secretary

Carolina Lopez, Treasurer

Chernor Bah

Chi-Chi Undie

Daniela Ligiero (ex officio)

Francis Barchi

Michele Moloney-Kitts, Vice Chair

Nicolette Naylor

Together for Girls Leadership Council organizations

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

USAID

U.S. Department of State’s Office of the Global AIDS Coordinator

Global Affairs Canada

UNAIDS

UNICEF

UNFPA

UN WOMEN

Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General on Violence against Children

WHO

PAHO/WHO

Brave SAGE (Survivor Advocates Globally Empowered) Members
Brave Global Steering Group

The Army of Survivors

Girls Not Brides

Together for Girls

WeProtect Global Alliance

World Vision International

SAGE representatives

Illustration girls standing together

We can help keep children and adolescents safe by working in a multi-sector, coordinated response - with partners and supporters like you.

Violence is preventable, change is possible.