Gender norms, education, and violence against girls and women: Lessons from Côte d’Ivoire

Using VACS and Afrobarometer data to examine the relationship between gender norms and multiple forms of violence

By Chrissy Hart, Senior Advisor & Manuela Balliet, Advisor, Together for Girls

The need for disaggregated data

For decades, advocates and researchers have stressed the need to collect more data on both violence against children and violence against women and have pushed to make sure data is disagreggated by sex, age and geography. There are few high-quality population-based data sets that measure various aspects of violence against children and women. One comprehensive household survey instrument that collects a wealth of information on the drivers, circumstances, prevalence and consequences of violence is the Violence Against Children and Youth Survey (VACS).

 

Findings from the VACS demonstrate that while boys and girls often face similar risks for violence, there is significant variation in experiences of violence based on gender and age, as well as contextual factors including social norms around gender roles and stereotypes and violence. 

 

With support from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and in partnership with Together for Girls and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), AidData, a Research Lab at the College of William & Mary, undertook analyses using the VACS and additional data sets to examine the relationship between schools and violence in several countries. This brief describes the results from an analysis in which AidData researchers triangulated data from Côte d’Ivoire’s Afrobarometer survey and the VACS conducted in 2018 to examine the relationship between gender norms, education, and violence in Côte d’Ivoire.  

Afrobarometer - Gender norms, education, and violence against girls and women: Lessons from Côte d’IvoireAfrobarometer is a non-partisan, pan-African research institution that conducts public attitude surveys on democracy, governance, the economy and society in more than 30 countries in Africa.

Gendered drivers of violence

Gender norms are widely recognized by researchers, policy-makers, advocates, and activists as a key driver for violence against children and women. Violence against women and children is both a manifestation of gender inequality and a mechanism by which that inequality is reinforced. Measuring violence and gathering data on prevalence, perpetration, and the contexts in which violence is experienced, as well as risk and protective factors is essential to understand the scope of violence and inform effective policies and programming to prevent and respond to violence.

Research background

The Côte d’Ivoire VACS is a nationally representative household survey of children and young adults aged 13-24 years. It was administered in 2018 by Côte d’Ivoire’s Ministry of Women, Families, and Children, with support from the CDC, across 73 departments. It measures the prevalence and circumstances surrounding emotional, physical and sexual violence against males and females in childhood, adolescence and young adulthood. 

 

For this analysis, AidData geospatially linked individual-level VACS violence variables to variables from the Afrobarometer survey, which assesses attitudes of adult respondents on a variety of topics. This was completed by aggregating relevant Afrobarometer variables to the department level and matching the resulting averages to VACS responses based on the respondent’s survey location. The analysis sought to elucidate the correlations between violence against girls, particularly school-related gender-based violence (SRGBV), and variables from the Afrobarometer, including attitudes toward gender equality, women’s rights, and education as a governmental priority.

 

Linking the VACS and Afrobarometer provides useful information on the relationship between violence against girls, particularly SRGBV, and attitudes toward gender equality and education at the department level.

CDI VACS cover - Gender norms, education, and violence against girls and women: Lessons from Côte d’Ivoire

Highlighted results

RESULT 1: Recognition of gender inequality and women’s rights as important problems facing the country is associated with decreased prevalence of physical violence against girls.

Broadly speaking, community-wide recognition of gender inequality and women’s rights as one of the most important problems facing the country is associated with decreased prevalence of physical violence against girls, but also increased prevalence of sexual violence against girls (see data note 2).

 

In addition, areas where there is a higher relative ratio of women to men who believe that gender inequality and women’s rights are important issues to address have lower prevalence of intimate partner physical violence, peer physical violence and school-related sexual violence against girls than do areas with a lower relative ratio. 

RESULT 2: Specific gender norms may have an impact on teacher-perpetrated violence

Departments in which the community as a whole is more likely to identify gender inequality and women’s rights as a top priority have lower prevalence of teacher-perpetrated physical violence against both males and females than do departments in which the community is less likely to identify these issues as a priority.

 

In particular, departments in which men identified gender inequality and women’s rights as a top priority have lower prevalence of teacher-perpetrated physical violence against girls than do departments in which men are less likely to identify these issues as a priority (see note 3 below)

 

In addition, departments in which women are more likely to support female political leaders have lower prevalence of corporal punishment against boys than do departments in which women are less supportive of female political leaders. However, norms among women in support of women holding office are not correlated with teacher-perpetrated physical violence against girls.

RESULT 3: Attainment of secondary education is associated with more gender equitable attitudes among girls.

Attending secondary school is associated with more equitable norms for girls. Among girls who completed primary school or less, 72% endorsed one or more negative or inequitable beliefs about gender, sexual practices, or intimate partner violence (IPV), compared to just 60% of girls who attended or completed secondary school or more. Attending secondary school is not associated with more equitable norms for boys.

Key recommendations

Recommendations for policy- and decision-makers, practitioners, researchers, advocates, and educators

 

Make the most of existing data on gender norms and violence against children and women. Given the dearth of disaggregated data on violence against children and violence against women, additional efforts to maximize the use of available data are the most accessible entry point to better understand the relationship between gender norms and different forms of violence. Governments and donors should invest in additional analyses of existing data, as well as more data triangulation between different data sources to inform policy and programs.  

 

Invest in research to better understand the relationship between gender norms, attitudes toward education, and violence against children and women. Different forms of violence may be associated with specific gender norms and attitudes, and trends may vary across geographies. For instance, in Côte d’Ivoire, sexual violence does not seem to be connected to attitudes around the importance of gender issues but may be more connected to norms around women’s sexuality and decision making in the context of sex, which is outside the scope of this research. In order to ensure that policies and interventions to prevent and respond to gender-based violence in schools, and violence writ large, are impactful, research to inform policies and interventions should measure attitudes around gender, including specific attitudes around gendered violence, and education.

 

Commit to gender-transformative education and approaches to prevent violence in schools. While more research is needed, there exists ample evidence from the VACS and data sources demonstrating that gender inequitable norms and attitudes are drivers of violence targeting girls and boys, as well as gender-non-conforming children and adolescents. Schools are crucial venues for transformational social changes to prevent violence and promote the health, well-being, and positive educational outcomes of all children and adolescents. Resources like UNGEI’s Whole School Approach to Preventing School-Related Gender-Based Violence and Raising Voices’ Good School Toolkit provide critical guidance for implementing concrete approaches to gender-transformative violence prevention efforts in schools. 

  1. Data limited to 51 departments of the 109 departments in Cote d’Ivoire
  2. The Afrobarometer asks respondents, “In your opinion, what are the most important problems facing this country that the government should address?” The three most important problems cited by the respondent are then recorded. We create a binary variable that is 0 if the respondent does not list gender issues/women’s rights as one of the top three problems, and 1 if they do. Any gender-related response given by a respondent is coded as “women’s rights/gender issues,” so the exact nature of the gender-related problem reported by respondents is not available.
  3. Includes teacher-perpetrated corporal punishment and teacher-perpetrated violence that may occur outside of the school setting

About the Project

With support from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and in partnership with Together for Girls and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the AidData Research Lab at the College of William & Mary undertook analyses using the VACS and additional data sets to examine the relationship between schools and violence in several countries.

 

This brief describes the results from an analysis in which AidData researchers triangulated data from Côte d’Ivoire’s Afrobarometer survey and the VACS conducted in 2018 to examine the relationship between gender norms, education, and violence in Côte d’Ivoire. 

iStock 903600926 1 - Gender norms, education, and violence against girls and women: Lessons from Côte d’Ivoire

Normes liées au genre, éducation, et violence contre les filles et les femmes: Leçons de la Côte d'Ivoire

Normes liées au genre, éducation, et violence contre les filles et les femmes: Leçons de la Côte d'Ivoire

Utilisation des données VACS et Afrobaromètre pour examiner la relation entre les normes liées au genre et les multiples formes de violence

La nécessité de disposer de données désagrégées

Depuis des décennies, les défenseurs et les chercheurs soulignent la nécessité de collecter davantage de données sur la violence contre les enfants et la violence contre les femmes et font pression pour que les données soient désagrégées par sexe, âge et zones géographiques. Il existe peu de séries de données de haute qualité basées sur la population qui mesurent les différents aspects de la violence contre les enfants et les femmes. L’enquête sur la violence contre les enfants et les jeunes (VACS) est un instrument complet d’enquête sur les ménages qui permet de recueillir une multitude d’informations sur les facteurs, les circonstances, la prévalence et les conséquences de la violence.

 

Les résultats de l’enquête VACS montrent que si les garçons et les filles sont souvent confrontés à des risques de violence similaires, les expériences de violence varient considérablement en fonction du sexe et de l’âge, ainsi que des facteurs contextuels, notamment les normes sociales relatives aux rôles et stéréotypes de genre et à la violence. 

 

Avec le soutien de l’Agence américaine pour le développement international (USAID) et en partenariat avec Together for Girls et les Centres américains de contrôle et de prévention des maladies (CDC), AidData, un laboratoire de recherche du College of William & Mary, a entrepris des analyses en utilisant le VACS et des ensembles de données supplémentaires pour examiner la relation entre les écoles et la violence dans plusieurs pays. Ce bulletin décrit les résultats d’une analyse dans laquelle les chercheurs d’AidData ont triangulé les données de l’enquête Afrobaromètre de la Côte d’Ivoire et du VACS réalisée en 2018 pour examiner la relation entre les normes liées au genre, l’éducation et la violence en Côte d’Ivoire. 

Afrobarometer - Gender norms, education, and violence against girls and women: Lessons from Côte d’Ivoire

Afrobaromètre  est une institution de recherche panafricaine non partisane qui mène des enquêtes sur l’attitude du public en matière de démocratie, de gouvernance, d’économie et de société dans plus de 30 pays d’Afrique.

Les facteurs sexospécifiques de la violence

Les normes liées au genre sont largement reconnues par les chercheurs, les décideurs, les défenseurs et les activistes comme un facteur clé de la violence contre les enfants et les femmes. De nombreuses déclarations et instruments des Nations unies reconnaissent que la violence contre les femmes et les enfants est à la fois une manifestation de l’inégalité entre les sexes et un mécanisme par lequel cette inégalité est renforcée. Il est essentiel de mesurer la violence et de recueillir des données sur la prévalence, la perpétration et les contextes dans lesquels la violence est vécue, ainsi que sur les facteurs de risque et de protection, afin de comprendre l’ampleur de la violence et d’élaborer des politiques et des programmes efficaces pour la prévenir et y répondre

Contexte de la recherche

L’enquête VACS Côte d’Ivoire est une enquête ménage représentative au niveau national auprès des enfants et des jeunes adultes âgés de 13 à 24 ans. Elle a été administrée en 2018 par le ministère de la Femme, de la Famille et de l’Enfance de Côte d’Ivoire, avec l’appui du CDC, dans 73 départements. Elle mesure la prévalence et les circonstances entourant la violence émotionnelle, physique et sexuelle contre les hommes et les femmes dans l’enfance, l’adolescence et le jeune âge adulte. 

 

Pour cette analyse, AidData a établi un lien géospatial entre les variables VACS relatives à la violence au niveau individuel et les variables de l’enquête Afrobaromètre, qui évalue les attitudes des répondants adultes sur une variété de sujets. Ceci a été réalisé en agrégeant les variables Afrobaromètre pertinentes au niveau départemental et en faisant correspondre les moyennes résultantes aux réponses VACS en fonction du lieu d’enquête du répondant. L’analyse a cherché à élucider les corrélations entre la violence contre les filles, en particulier la violence sexiste en milieu scolaire (SRGBV), et les variables de l’Afrobaromètre, notamment les attitudes envers l’égalité des sexes, les droits des femmes et l’éducation en tant que priorité gouvernementale.

 

 L’établissement d’un lien entre le VACS et l’Afrobaromètre fournit des informations utiles sur la relation entre la violence à l’égard des filles, en particulier la SRGBV, et les attitudes envers l’égalité des sexes et l’éducation au niveau départemental.

Résultats mis en évidence

RÉSULTAT 1 : la reconnaissance de l'inégalité des sexes et des droits des femmes comme des problèmes importants auxquels le pays est confronté est associée à une diminution de la prévalence de la violence physique contre les filles.

De manière générale, la reconnaissance par la communauté de l’inégalité entre les sexes et des droits des femmes comme l’un des problèmes les plus importants du pays est associée à une diminution de la prévalence de la violence physique à l’encontre des filles, mais aussi à une augmentation de la prévalence de la violence sexuelle à l’encontre des filles (voir note de données 2).

 

En outre, les zones où le rapport relatif entre les femmes et les hommes qui pensent que les inégalités entre les sexes et les droits des femmes sont des questions importantes à traiter est plus élevé, présentent une prévalence plus faible de la violence physique exercée par le partenaire intime, de la violence physique exercée par les pairs et de la violence sexuelle liée à l’école à l’encontre des filles que les zones où le rapport relatif est plus faible. 

Les départements dans lesquels la communauté dans son ensemble est plus susceptible d’identifier l’inégalité des sexes et les droits des femmes comme une priorité absolue présentent une prévalence plus faible de la violence physique perpétrée par les enseignants à l’encontre des hommes et des femmes que les départements dans lesquels la communauté est moins susceptible d’identifier ces questions comme une priorité.

 

En particulier, les départements dans lesquels les hommes ont identifié l’inégalité entre les sexes et les droits des femmes comme une priorité absolue présentent une prévalence plus faible de violence physique perpétrée par les enseignants à l’encontre des filles que les départements dans lesquels les hommes sont moins susceptibles d’identifier ces questions comme une priorité (voir note 3 ci-dessous).

 

Par ailleurs, les départements dans lesquels les femmes sont plus susceptibles de soutenir les femmes leaders politiques présentent une prévalence plus faible de châtiments corporels contre les garçons que les départements dans lesquels les femmes soutiennent moins les femmes leaders politiques. Cependant, les normes parmi les femmes en faveur de l’accès des femmes aux fonctions officielles ne sont pas corrélées avec la violence physique perpétrée par les enseignants à l’encontre des filles.

Les départements dans lesquels la communauté dans son ensemble est plus susceptible d’identifier l’inégalité des sexes et les droits des femmes comme une priorité absolue présentent une prévalence plus faible de la violence physique perpétrée par les enseignants à l’encontre des hommes et des femmes que les départements dans lesquels la communauté est moins susceptible d’identifier ces questions comme une priorité.

 

En particulier, les départements dans lesquels les hommes ont identifié l’inégalité entre les sexes et les droits des femmes comme une priorité absolue présentent une prévalence plus faible de violence physique perpétrée par les enseignants à l’encontre des filles que les départements dans lesquels les hommes sont moins susceptibles d’identifier ces questions comme une priorité (voir note 3 ci-dessous).

 

Par ailleurs, les départements dans lesquels les femmes sont plus susceptibles de soutenir les femmes leaders politiques présentent une prévalence plus faible de châtiments corporels contre les garçons que les départements dans lesquels les femmes soutiennent moins les femmes leaders politiques. Cependant, les normes parmi les femmes en faveur de l’accès des femmes aux fonctions officielles ne sont pas corrélées avec la violence physique perpétrée par les enseignants à l’encontre des filles.

RÉSULTAT 3 : L'obtention d'une éducation secondaire est associée à des attitudes plus équitables entre les sexes chez les filles.

La fréquentation de l’école secondaire est associée à des normes plus équitables pour les filles. Parmi les filles qui ont terminé l’école primaire ou moins, 72% ont endossé une ou plusieurs croyances négatives ou inéquitables sur le genre, les pratiques sexuelles ou la violence du partenaire intime (VPI), contre seulement 60% des filles qui ont fréquenté ou terminé l’école secondaire ou plus. La fréquentation de l’école secondaire n’est pas associée à des normes plus équitables pour les garçons.

cote divoire VACS - Gender norms, education, and violence against girls and women: Lessons from Côte d’Ivoire

Recommandations clés

Recommandations à l’intention des responsables politiques et des décideurs, des praticiens, des chercheurs, des défenseurs et des éducateurs

 

Tirer le meilleur parti des données existantes sur les normes liées au genre et la violence contre les enfants et les femmes. Compte tenu de la rareté des données ventilées sur la violence contre les enfants et les femmes, des efforts supplémentaires pour maximiser l’utilisation des données disponibles constituent le point d’entrée le plus accessible pour mieux comprendre la relation entre les normes liées au genre et les différentes formes de violence. Les gouvernements et les donateurs doivent investir dans des analyses supplémentaires des données existantes, ainsi que dans la triangulation des données entre les différentes sources de données afin d’informer les politiques et les programmes.  

 

Investir dans la recherche pour mieux comprendre la relation entre les normes liées au genre, les attitudes envers l’éducation et la violence contre les enfants et les femmes. Différentes formes de violence peuvent être associées à des normes liées au genre et à des attitudes spécifiques, et les tendances peuvent varier d’une région à l’autre. Par exemple, en Côte d’Ivoire, la violence sexuelle ne semble pas être liée aux attitudes concernant l’importance des questions de genre, mais peut être davantage liée aux normes concernant la sexualité des femmes et la prise de décision dans le contexte du sexe, ce qui sort du cadre de cette recherche. Afin de s’assurer que les politiques et les interventions visant à prévenir et à répondre à la violence basée sur le genre dans les écoles, et à la violence en général, ont un impact, la recherche visant à informer les politiques et les interventions doit mesurer les attitudes concernant le genre, y compris les attitudes spécifiques concernant la violence basée sur le genre, et l’éducation.

 

S’engager en faveur d’une éducation et d’approches respectueuses de l’égalité des sexes pour prévenir la violence à l’école. Bien que des recherches supplémentaires soient nécessaires, il existe de nombreuses preuves provenant de l’enquête VACS et de sources de données démontrant que les normes et les attitudes inéquitables entre les sexes sont des moteurs de la violence à l’encontre des filles et des garçons, ainsi que des enfants et des adolescents non conformes au genre. Les écoles sont des lieux cruciaux pour les changements sociaux transformationnels visant à prévenir la violence et à promouvoir la santé, le bien-être et les résultats scolaires positifs de tous les enfants et adolescents. Des ressources telles que l’approche globale de l’école pour la prévention de la violence sexiste en milieu scolaire (Whole School Approach to Preventing School-Related Gender-Based Violence) de l’UNGEI et la boîte à outils Good School (Good School Toolkit) de Raising Voices fournissent des conseils essentiels pour la mise en œuvre d’approches concrètes de prévention de la violence sexiste dans les écoles. 

  1. Données limitées à 51 départements sur les 109 que compte la Côte d’Ivoire.
  2. L’Afrobaromètre demande aux personnes interrogées : “A votre avis, quels sont les problèmes les plus importants auxquels ce pays est confronté et auxquels le gouvernement devrait s’attaquer ?” Les trois problèmes les plus importantes cités par le répondant sont alors enregistrés. Nous créons une variable binaire qui donne 0 si la personne interrogée ne cite pas les questions de genre/droits des femmes comme l’un des trois principaux problèmes, et 1 si elle le fait. Toute réponse liée au genre donnée par un répondant est codée comme “droits des femmes/questions de genre”, de sorte que la nature exacte du problème lié au genre signalé par les répondants n’est pas disponible.
  3. Comprend les châtiments corporels infligés par l’enseignant et la violence infligée par l’enseignant qui peut se produire en dehors du cadre scolaire

À propos du projet

Avec le soutien de l’Agence américaine pour le développement international (USAID) et en partenariat avec Together for Girls et les Centres américains de contrôle et de prévention des maladies (CDC), le laboratoire de recherche AidData du College of William & Mary a entrepris des analyses en utilisant le VACS et des ensembles de données supplémentaires pour examiner la relation entre les écoles et la violence dans plusieurs pays.

 

Cette note décrit les résultats d’une analyse dans laquelle les chercheurs d’AidData ont triangulé les données de l’enquête Afrobaromètre de la Côte d’Ivoire et de l’enquête VACS menée en 2018 pour examiner la relation entre les normes liées au genre, l’éducation et la violence en Côte d’Ivoire. 

iStock 903600926 1 - Gender norms, education, and violence against girls and women: Lessons from Côte d’Ivoire

Read More Safe Articles: